Portrait Gallery

The portrait gallery showcases many of the photographs and portraits of the Cahoon family and other early Bay Village residents.

In the Victorian era, technology was going through rapid developments, including the new process of photography. With the introduction of albumen prints, photography and portraiture was now cheap enough to become commercially available to the middle class. Instead of spending time and money to sit for an artist to paint a single portrait of their loved ones, families could now take a short afternoon trip to one of many photography studios.

Cleveland had many studios during this time, including the “Studio of Photographie, M. M. Udell,” at 11 & 13 Euclid Avenue. The back of one of their cabinet cards, pictured here, features an ornate advertisement for the studio. The portraits of the Cahoon brothers are some examples of cabinet cards (Frame #25).
Photography had also progressed far enough that cameras could be taken outside of the studio. In fact, a photographer could come out to document important events such as wedding anniversaries and family reunions. Rose Hill’s portrait gallery showcases many of these photographs, such as Joel and Margaret Cahoon’s golden wedding anniversary in 1881 (Frame #10).
Besides photographs, other types of portraits are seen here. Before commercially available photography a few early Dover residents sat for more traditional portraits such as Joel and Margaret Cahoon when they were a young couple (Frames #5 and #6). Large hand-drawn crayon copies of photographic portraits are also on display, likely made so that the portraits could be framed and hung on the walls rather than kept in a photo album.
Portrait Gallery Key
To read about a particular portrait or photograph, click on the frame number and title below. Or start from the beginning with Emma Hackett Cahoon’s portrait.


Frame #1: Emmeline “Emma” Hackett Cahoon


b. 1808
d. 1876, Elyria, Ohio
Emeline “Emma” Hackett Cahoon was born in 1808. She married Benjamin Cahoon on December 1, 1835. They had at least eight children together. Their daughters can be seen in a group portrait at Rose Hill in frames #8 and #22. She was described by Ida Cahoon, in her book History of the Cahoon Family, as “…a most excellent wife and model mother.” Emma lived to be 68 years old and is buried in Ridgelawn Cemetery, Elyria, Ohio.

Frame #2: Joel Butler Cahoon

Joel Butler Cahoon, along with his family, were the first settlers of Bay Village. He sat for a few different portraits over the years. This portrait was painted in his old age, after he had let his beard grow long. To read more about Joel and view a portrait of him as a young man, go to frame #5.

Frame #3: Benjamin Reynolds Cahoon

b. 14 July 1805, Montgomery County, New York
d. 29 Sept. 1872, Elyria, Ohio
Benjamin Reynolds Cahoon was the eighth child of Joseph and Lydia Cahoon and came with the family to Dover in 1810. Benjamin worked as a stone cutter in Cincinnati and Elyria. He married Emeline Hackett on December 1, 1835. They had at least eight children together. Benjamin and Emma’s daughters can be seen in a group portrait at Rose Hill in frames #8 and #22.
According to Ida Cahoon, in her book History of the Cahoon Family, “…Uncle Benjamin was very fond of flowers, fruits and all the beautiful objects he could have about him and was excellent company among his many friends.” Benjamin passed away at the age of 67. He is buried in Ridgelawn Cemetery, Elyria, Ohio.

Frame #4: Lydia, Laura, and Ida Cahoon

Lydia, Laura, and Ida Cahoon pose with a book for a studio portrait. It was likely taken sometime after 1903, when their sister, Martha, passed away. It appears to be a part of a series of photographs taken at one session. Another photograph from this session is Lydia’s portrait in frame #7 where she is seen reading the same book, likely a prop provided by the studio. Read more about the sisters here.

Frame #5: Joel Butler Cahoon

b. 27 Aug. 1793, Salisbury, New York
d. 28 Sept. 1882, Rose Hill, Dover Township, Ohio
Joel Butler Cahoon was the third son of Joseph and Lydia Cahoon. He moved to Dover with his parents and siblings in 1810. Joel and his brother Daniel started a contracting business building public works such as canals, aqueducts, viaducts, and railroads in Ohio, Indiana, and Maryland.
While in Maryland he married Margaret Van Allen Dickson on July 14, 1831. They would move into Rose Hill in 1842. In 1881, they celebrated their golden anniversary. A photo was taken of the couple with the many guests who visited them at Rose Hill for the occasion. Joel passed away the next year at the age of 89 and is buried in Lakeside Cemetery.
He likely sat for this portrait soon after his marriage to Margaret. You can view other portraits of him in frames #2 and #26.

Frame #6: Margaret Van Allen Dickson Cahoon

b. 8 Feb. 1810, Washington D. C.
d. 21 June 1894, Cleveland, Ohio
Margaret Van Allen Dickson Cahoon married John Douglas Van Allen on August 16, 1827, who passed away two years later in March 1829. She met Joel in Maryland in 1830 while staying with an aunt. They married a year later and had eleven children together, eventually settling at Rose Hill. In 1881, they celebrated their golden anniversary. A photo was taken of the couple with the many guests who visited them at Rose Hill for the occasion. Margaret passed away at the age of 84, outliving her husband and all but six of her children. She is buried in Lakeside Cemetery.

Frame #7: Lydia Elizabeth Cahoon

Lydia poses here with a book for a photography session with her two surviving sisters, Laura and Ida. Another photograph from this session is a portrait of the three sisters reading the same book in frame #4. Read more about Lydia here.

Frame #8: Children of Benjamin Cahoon and Joel Cahoon

The daughters of Benjamin Cahoon (back row) pose with the children of Joel Cahoon (front row) at Rose Hill. The Cahoon Barn (now the Community Center) can be seen in the distance. This group portrait was likely taken at the Cahoon reunion seen in frame #22. Of Joel’s children, only the four sisters and Thomas are seen, placing the photograph between 1899, when John Marshall Cahoon passed, and 1903, when Martha Cahoon (far left) passed. Scroll down to read about Benjamin’s daughters, visit frame #17 to read about Joel’s daughters, and visit frame #25 to read about Thomas.
Daughters of Benjamin Cahoon, back row, left to right: Helen Bullock, Abigail Schneerer, Jeanette Cahoon, and Minerva Hollenbach.
Children of Joel Cahoon, front row, left to right: Martha Cahoon, Lydia Cahoon, Thomas Cahoon, Ida Cahoon, and Laura Cahoon.

Benjamin Reynold Cahoon’s Daughters


Helen Cahoon Bullock
b. 24 Dec. 1836, Elyria, Ohio
d. 19 July 1924, Elyria, Ohio
Helen was the second child of Benjamin and Emma Cahoon. She married Aaron H. Bullock in 1870. They lived in Elyria. Helen lived to be 88 years old and is buried in Ridgelawn Cemetery.


Abigail Frances Cahoon Schneerer
b. 7 Aug. 1852, Elyria, Ohio
d. 13 Aug. 1925, Norwalk, Ohio
Abigail was the eighth child of Benjamin and Emma Cahoon. She married Dr. Frederick W. Schneerer, a Union soldier. She passed away at the age of 73 and is buried in Woodlawn Cemetery, Norwalk, Ohio.


Jeanette Rebecca Cahoon
b. 26 Jan. 1842
d. 18 Dec. 1902, Elyria, Ohio
Jeanette was the sixth child of Benjamin and Emma Cahoon. She never married. Jeanette lived with her cousin, Thomas Cahoon, and his wife, Elizabeth, in Cleveland. She lived to be 59 years old.


Minerva Cahoon Hollenbach
b. 1 Mar. 1838
d. 1 Dec. 1915, Cuyahoga County, Ohio
Minerva was the fourth child of Benjamin and Emma Cahoon. She married Reuben Hollenbach on September 17, 1863 in Lorain County. They lived in Cleveland. She lived to be 77 years old.

Frame #9: Rebecca Cahoon Griffith

b. 1798, Salisbury, New York
d. 1859
Rebecca Cahoon was the sixth child of Joseph and Lydia Cahoon. She came to Dover with her parents when she was twelve years old. She married Jacob Heath on November 16, 1823. The couple had two children, Silicia Heath and Franklin Heath. However, the marriage didn’t last and they divorced. On November 14, 1850, Rebecca married Ebenezer Griffith. Her daughter’s son, Walter Wright, became the Cahoon family’s lawyer and processed the will that set up Rose Hill as a museum. Walter and his family can be seen at the Cahoon family reunion in frame #22 and their daughter, Margaret Wright Glendenning’s portrait is in frame #16.

Frame #10: 1881 Golden Wedding Anniversary

The Cahoon family gathered at Rose Hill for Joel and Margaret’s golden wedding anniversary on July 14, 1881. In Margaret’s autobiography, she estimates there were 150 guests present. She describes how, that morning, she and Joel exchanged rings engraved with their initials and date of their anniversary. A photograph was taken that day of all the guests. Her children can be seen in the front row, sitting from youngest to oldest.

Frame #11: Leverett Judson Cahoon

This portrait of Leverett Judson Cahoon is a carte de visite or calling card print. This type of photographic portraiture was popular between 1859 to the early 1870s.
A four lensed camera could take eight negatives on a single glass pane. The resulting print would be cut into eight individual portraits and pasted to cards. With eight copies automatically made per session, carte de visite prints could be used similarly to calling cards and exchanged socially. They were mailed, given at holidays and birthdays as small gifts, and collected in albums.
However, in the 1870s the carte de visite cards began to be replaced by the larger cabinet cards as technology improved. Large prints were no longer as labor intensive and expensive as they had been. People jumped on the chance to have larger, more detailed photographs of their family and friends.
This carte de visite portrait of Leverett was likely taken in the 1860s. The back is decorated with the studio’s name, Ryder’s, which was located at 239 Superior Street, Cleveland, Ohio.
To learn more about Leverett go to frame #25.

Frame #12: Henry C. Wischmeyer, Jr.

b. 27 Sept. 1872, Dover Township, Ohio
d. 4 July 1959, Bay Village, Ohio
Henry C. Wischmeyer, Jr. was the fifth child of Henry Wischmeyer, Sr. and Regina Rentschler Wischmeyer. He worked with his father raising grapes. The family had a winery and lakefront hotel on Lake Road near Glen Park Drive. This was likely where Henry gained an understanding of many types of boats, inspiring him to build and design model boats. Blueprints of his boats are at Osborn Learning Center and many of his completed models are displayed in the basement of Rose Hill. Henry lived to be 87 years old and is buried in Lakeside Cemetery.
His portrait and his sister’s are both opaque watercolor over a photographic print. The artist is unknown.

Frame #13: Olga Wilhemine Wischmeyer

b. 19 Feb. 1869, Dover Township, Ohio
d. 27 Mar. 1948, Village of Bay, Ohio
Olga Wilhemine Wischmeyer was the fourth child of Henry Wischmeyer, Sr. and Regina Rentschler Wischmeyer. She worked at her father’s hotel as a cook and was a member of the Library and Museum Committee for the City of Bay Village. She never married. Olga lived to be 79 years old and is buried in Lakeside Cemetery.
Her portrait and her brother’s are both opaque watercolor over a photographic print. The artist is unknown.

Frame #14: Aaron Aldrich III and Elizabeth “Betsy” Aldrich


This daguerreotype portrait of Aaron Aldrich II and Elizabeth Winsor Aldrich was taken on April 27, 1854, on Aaron’s birthday. The case made for the daguerreotype was inscribed “A- Aldrich age 62 / April 27-1854 & Mrs. / E- Aldrich age 60 / December 22 – 1854 / Dover Ohio.” However, this contradicts the date of birth given on his grave (1795), which would have made him 59 when this photo was taken.

Aaron Aldrich III
b. 27 Apr. 1795 (?), Smithfield, Rhode Island
d. 27 May 1856, Dover Township, Ohio
Aaron Aldrich III, was the son of Aaron Aldrich II and Mary (Marcy) Waterman. He married Elizabeth “Betsy” Windsor on September 11, 1814 in Smithfield, Rhode Island. The two moved to Dover Township, Ohio in 1816  with their one year old son, Aaron Aldrich IV, and a year later had another son they named William Waterman (frame #21). The family did not settle permanently in Dover until 1829 when Aaron purchased a 140-acre farm along Lake Erie. There, Aaron set up a tannery and made furniture. He was elected as a magistrate in the township for many years and helped form the First Baptist Church of Dover. Aaron lived to be 61 years old and is buried in Lakeside Cemetery.

Elizabeth “Betsy” Windsor Aldrich
b. 22 Dec. 1794, Smithfield, Rhode Island
d. 28 Dec. 1869, Dover Township, Ohio
Elizabeth “Betsy” Windsor was the daughter of Augustus Winsor and Nancy Waterman. She married Aaron Aldrich III and settled with him in Dover. They had five children together. Betsy lived to be 75 years old. She is buried in Lakeside Cemetery.

Frame #15: Children of Joel and Margaret Cahoon

The children of Joel and Margaret Cahoon pose for a portrait in front of Rose Hill. This was likely taken shortly after June 21, 1894, when Margaret passed at the age of 84, outliving all but six of her children. Read more about Margaret at frame #6, her daughters at frame #17, and her sons at frame #25.


Standing, left to right: Thomas Cahoon, Martha Cahoon, Ida Cahoon, and John Marshall Cahoon.
Sitting, left to right: Laura Cahoon, Lydia Cahoon, and an empty seat likely representing their mother, Margaret Cahoon.

Frame #16: Margaret Fairely Wright Glendenning

b. July 1894, Cleveland, Ohio
d. 16 May 1957, Mount Vernon, Ohio
Margaret C. Fairely Wright was the daughter of Walter Wright and Maria Palmer, and Joseph and Lydia Cahoon’s great-great-granddaughter. She was present at Laura Cahoon’s funeral in 1917, where she opened the service singing, “My Jesus as Thou Wilt.” She married Donald O. Glendenning, son of Amos Glendenning and Luella Osborn (the great-granddaughter of Reuben Osborn), on October 21, 1922. Margaret lived to be 63 years old. She is buried in Evergreen Cemetery in Westlake, Ohio.

Frame #17: The Cahoon Sisters

Joel and Margaret Cahoon had four daughters who survived to adulthood. All four of them were school teachers in the Cleveland area and never married. All were active in the Commodore Perry Chapter of the Daughters of 1812 as well as the Dover Lake Episcopal Church. They split their time between Rose Hill and their house at 1916 Broadway in Cleveland.
Standing, left to right: Lydia, Laura, and Ida Cahoon. Sitting: Martha Cahoon.

The Cahoon Sisters

Lydia Elizabeth Cahoon
Frames #4, #7, #8, #10, #15, #17, #22, #29
b. 16 Aug 1835, Frederich, Maryland
d. 29 Mar. 1917, Rose Hill, Village of Bay, Ohio
Lydia Elizabeth Cahoon was the third child of Joel and Margaret Cahoon. She was a school teacher in Toledo, at Cuyahoga County schools, and in the Cleveland School System. She was a founding member of the Ladies Aid Society at the Methodist Episcopal Church. Lydia passed away at Rose Hill at the age of 82 and is buried in Lakeside Cemetery.


Laura Ellen Cahoon
Frames #4, #8, #10, #15, #17, #18, #22
b. 12 Dec. 1841, Cleves, Hamilton County, Ohio
d. 2 June 1917, Rose Hill, Village of Bay, Ohio
Laura Ellen Cahoon was the sixth child of Joel and Margaret Cahoon. She taught at many schools, teaching mainly the first grade. She taught for over 45 years. She once gave this advice to young teachers: “Never go into the work of preparing a child for life simply as a means to make a living. Unless you love children and love to work with children, your place isn’t with them. A little girl or boy is the most precious thing in the world.” Laura passed away at Rose Hill at the age of 76 and is buried in Lakeside Cemetery.


Martha Washington Cahoon
Frames #8, #10, #17, #22
b. 22 Feb. 1844, Rose Hill, Dover Township, Ohio
d. 19 May 1903, Rose Hill, Village of Bay, Ohio
Martha Washington Cahoon was born on George Washington’s birthday, which prompted her namesake. She was the seventh child of Joel and Margaret Cahoon. Martha was a school teacher, getting her start in Toledo before teaching in the Cleveland School System. Martha passed away at Rose Hill at the age of 59 and is buried in Lakeside Cemetery.


Ida Maria Cahoon
Frames #4, #8, #10, #15, #17, #22
b. 17 Mar. 1852, Rose Hill, Dover Township, Ohio
d. 28 Nov. 1917, Rose Hill, Village of Bay , Ohio
Ida Maria Cahoon was the youngest child of Joel and Margaret Cahoon. She received her Teacher’s Certificate on April 15, 1871 and taught in the Cleveland School System and served on the Bay Village Board of Education. She was the president of the Cahoon Family Centennial in 1910 while her sister Lydia, served as vice president. She wrote two books. Looking Backwards detailed the history and events of the Saturday Reading Club while The History of Cahoon Family told the story of her family. Ida passed away at Rose Hill at the age of 65 and is buried in Lakeside Cemetery.

Frame #18: The Broadway House

While the Cahoon sisters were teaching in Cleveland they lived in a house at 1916 Broadway. They sometimes shared the house with other teachers, such as Ada Hine, a teacher who is listed as a boarder at 1916 Broadway in the 1900 census. On the weekends and during breaks, they would take the train out from Cleveland to Rose Hill.

Frame #19: Effie Cahoon Ellis

b. 1861, Cleveland, Ohio
d. 18 April 1888, Cleveland, Ohio
Effie Cahoon was the first and only child born to Thomas and Elizabeth Cahoon. She married Dr. Clifton D. Ellis on October 24, 1883. This photograph was likely taken of her wearing her wedding dress from that day. Her husband had a general practice and was a professor of Osteology and Minor Surgery at the Cleveland University of Medicine and Surgery. She died of tuberculosis at the age of 27 and is buried in Lakeside Cemetery.

Frame #20: The Aldrich Family

William Waterman Aldrich II was the first born son of William Waterman Aldrich I and Martha Bassett Aldrich. He was a farmer, learning the trade from his father. In 1857 he bought land from Christian Saddler and built a house before marrying Jeanette Bates on June 12, 1862. They had ten children, all pictured here. It is said that for each child’s birth, a tree was planted on the lawn and the house was steadily expanded to accommodate the family. All seven daughters were married in the parlor of the house William built, and the funerals of William and Jeanette were held there. The house still stands at 366 Bassett Road.
Back row, left to right: Annabelle, Evalena, Martha Bassett, Howard Vincent, Imogene Rachel, Berthenia Capitola, and Edythe Amelia.
Front row, left to right: Gertrude Florence, William Waterman II, Clifton Irving, Jeanette Bates, and William Waterman III.

<h4>William and Jeanette Aldrich’s Children</h4>


Imogene Rachel Aldrich
b. 6 May 1863, Dover Township, Ohio
d. 24 Mar. 1931, Dover Village, Ohio
Imogene was the first child of William and Jeanette Aldrich. She married George Alexander Williams on November 10, 1880. They had five children together. George ran a fruit farm on Center Ridge Road, which their son Leonard later took over after George’s death. Imogene passed away at the age of 68 and is buried in Evergreen Cemetery, Westlake, Ohio.


Berthenia Capitola Aldrich
b. 2 May 1864, Dover Township, Ohio
d. 26 Apr. 1894, Carlisle Township, Ohio
Berthenia was the second child of William and Jeanette Aldrich. She married Robert John Smith on June 24, 1885. Robert was a farmer and both of his parents were from England. They had six children together. She passed away at the age of 30 and is buried in Ridgelawn Cemetery, Elyria, Ohio.


Martha Bassett Aldrich
b. 25 Nov. 1865, Dover Township, Ohio
d. 12 Aug. 1957, Chicago, Illinois
Martha Bassett Aldrich was the third child of William and Jeanette Aldrich. She was named after William’s mother. She married Isaac Beaucock on October 27, 1887. They had three children together. At some point between their marriage, and the birth of their son Clarence in 1897, they moved to Chicago where Isaac worked as a contract decorator and painter. Martha passed away at the age of 92 and is buried in Irving Park Cemetery, Chicago, Illinois.


Evalena Jeanette Aldrich

b. 17 Mar. 1867, Dover Township, Ohio
d. 5 Mar. 1956, Lorain County, Ohio
Evalena (Evelyn) Aldrich was the fourth child of William and Jeanette Aldrich. She married George Linsley in 1896 and had a daughter, Grace, in 1898. She then married Heinrich Lade on March 22, 1903. They had a son, Bernhardt Lade. Henry passed away in 1907. Evalena then married John Meister, divorcing him in 1918 before marrying John W. Thomson who worked at a steel plant. Sometime before 1930, he passed away and Evalena and her son went to live with Evalena’s mother. She lived to be 89.


Howard Vincent Aldrich
b. 22 Aug. 1869, Dover Township, Ohio
d. 6 Mar. 1947, Cleveland, Ohio
Howard Vincent Aldrich was the fifth child of William and Jeanette Aldrich. He married Alice McCarty on November 17, 1889. They had two children together. Howard worked as a manager of a seed store in Cleveland. He passed away at the age of 78 and is buried in Evergreen Cemetery, Westlake, Ohio.


Annabelle Hurst Aldrich
b. 30 Oct. 1873, Dover Township, Ohio
d. 9 Oct. 1950, Lakewood, Ohio
Annabelle was the sixth child of William and Jeanette Aldrich. She married Clayton M. Terry on January 25, 1897. He worked as a clerk at a steel plant in 1910. They had three children together. She passed away at the age of 76 and is buried in Butternut Ridge Cemetery, Eaton, Ohio.


Edythe Amelia Aldrich
b. 14 Aug. 1876, Dover Township, Ohio
d. 8 Jan. 1961, Elyria, Ohio
Edythe Amelia Aldrich was the seventh child of William and Jeanette Alrdich. She married Herbert Marcus Barker on April 5, 1905. Herbert had a younger sister, Mary Adeline Barker who married Edythe’s younger brother, Clifton. Edythe and Herbert moved to Elba, New York within a year, where Herbert started a farm. The couple had one child together, Gertrude Barker. Herbert passed away in 1924. By 1930, Edythe had moved back to Ohio where she made a home with her daughter in Elyria. She passed away at the age of 86 and is buried in Evergreen Cemetery, Westlake, Ohio.


Clifton Irving Aldrich
b. 21 Nov. 1878, Dover Township, Ohio
d. 17 May 1970, Avon, Ohio
Clifton Irving Aldrich was the eighth child of William and Jeanette Aldrich. He married Mary Adeline Barker on August 27, 1903. Mary Adeline’s brother would marry Clifton’s older sister two years later. Clifton and Mary Adeline had three children together. They raised their children on the fruit farm Clifton owned. He passed away at the age of 92 and is buried in Evergreen Cemetery, Westlake, Ohio.


Gertrude Florence Aldrich
b. 3 Apr. 1880, Dover Township, Ohio
d. 25 Dec. 1949, Benton Harbor, Michigan
Gertrude Florence Aldrich was the ninth child of William and Jeanette Aldrich. She married Frank Leslie Simanton on March 7, 1907. In 1908, when Gertrude gave birth to her first child, Edith, they were living in Illinois. By 1910 they had moved to Fargo, North Dakota where Frank taught high school. By 1920 they were living in Illinois again, in Brookside, where Frank was working as an entomologist with the U.S. government. Ten years later they were living in Benton Harbor, Michigan where Frank continued his work as an entomologist. The couple stayed in Benton Harbor for the rest of their lives, having a total of five children together. Gertrude passed away at the age of 69 and is buried in Crystal Springs Cemetery, Benton Harbor, Michigan.


William Waterman Aldrich III
b. 4 Sept. 1882, Dover Township, Ohio
d. 30 Sept. 1946, Toledo, Ohio
William Waterman Aldrich III was the tenth child of William and Jeanette Aldrich. He married Florence Mitchell  on December 25, 1906, and they had one child together, Melvern William Aldrich. They lived in Rockport (now Rocky River) where William worked as a clerk at a coal office. The couple later divorced in 1918. William then married Ruby Teasdale on August 16, 1920, and they had two children together, William Waterman Aldrich IV and Norma Jean Aldrich. By 1930 he was working as a manager for a heating company in Elyria. Ten years later in 1940, he and Ruby were divorced and he was working as a timekeeper in Lorain. He passed away at the age of 64 and is buried in Ridgehill Memorial Cemetery, Amherst, Ohio.

Frame #21: Anna M. Taintor Cahoon

b. 1871, Illinois
d. unknown
Anna M. Taintor Cahoon was the adopted daughter of Thomas and Elizabeth Cahoon. She was a painter, designer, and interior decorator in Cleveland from the mid-1880s to at least 1897. She graduated from the Wester Reserve School of Design in 1888 and attended classes at the Cleveland School of Art while working at William Otis’s Household Art Company. She was listed as an artist in the 1893 Cleveland City Directory. In 1896, Anna partnered with Amy E. Smith in a decorating and applied art business that they had at least until 1898.

Frame #22: Cahoon Family Reunion

The descendants of Joseph and Lydia Cahoon gathered for a reunion at Rose Hill sometime after 1899 (John Marshall’s death), but before 1903 (Martha’s death). The reunion included the Wright, Bullock, Hollenbach, and Andrews families. The Wrights are the descendants of Joseph and Lydia Cahoon’s daughter, Rebecca. The Bullocks and Hollenbachs are descendants of Joseph and Lydia Cahoon’s son, Benjamin. The Andrews family is very distantly related to the Cahoons but were considered close family friends.


Top Row: 1-6. Unknown, 7. Walter Wright, 8. Tom Wright, 9. Maria Palmer Wright, 10. Aaron Bullock, 11. Bertha Wilbur Bullock, 12. Mabel Bullock, and 13. Alva Bullock.
Middle Row: 27. Everett Benjamin Cahoon, 28. Thomas Cahoon, 29. Martha Cahoon, 30. Helen Cahoon Bullock, and 31. Jeannette Cahoon.
Bottom Row: 19-22. Unknown, 23. Margaret Wright, and 24. Unknown.


Front Row: 14. Mary Hollenbach, 15. Unknown, 16. Lulu Hollenbach Manter, 17. Reuben Hollenbach, 18. Elizabeth Hollenbach Dougherty, 19. Unknown, 20. Ida Cahoon, 21. Unknown, 22. Jay Collin Andrews, 23. Lillian Spoor Andrews, 24. Edwin R. Andrews, 25. George Andrews, and 26. Unknown.
Middle Row: 32. Minerva Cahoon Hollenbach, 33. Lydia Cahoon, 34. Laura Cahoon, 35. Abigail Cahoon Schneerer, 36. Maria Webb Andrews, 37. Frank Andrews, and 38-43. Unknown.
Front Row: 44. Unknown, 45. Virginia Andrews Hutchinson, 46. William Harron Andrews, 47. Jay Andrews, 48. Dan Andrews, and 49. Louise Andrews Sanders.

Frame #23: The Powell Family

Perry Powell was born on April 29, 1836 to Thomas Powell and Sophia Sadler Powell. He married Sarah Milner in 1867. The north forty acres of Thomas’ farm were deeded to Perry, along with the old Powell house where he resided with his family. The couple had three children, Elvie Powell Dodd (left), Clinton Powell (middle), and Mary Powell (right). All of the Powells are buried in Evergreen Cemetery, Westlake, Ohio except for Mary who moved to Santa Barbara with her husband.

The Powell Family

Perry Powell
Front, right.
b. 29 Apr. 1836, Dover Township, Ohio
d. 16 Jul. 1915, Village of Bay, Ohio
Perry Powell was the first child of Thomas and Sarah Powell. For a time he worked as a carpenter and joiner according to the 1880 census before taking over his father’s farm. After his wife’s death in 1898, he worked the farm before going to live with his eldest daughter and her family on their farm. He lived to be 79 years old.

Sarah Milner Powell
Front, left.
b. 13 Apr. 1847, Mayfield, Ohio
d. 23 Sept. 1898
Sarah was the daughter of Harriet Horn and James Milner. Her father immigrated from East Riding of Yorkshire, England. Her mother was from New York. James passed away a year after Sarah was born. Her and her mother, along with her three siblings, went to live with her uncle, John Horn, on his farm. Sarah married Perry Powell in 1867. She passed away at the age of 51.


Alva “Elvie” Powell Dodd
Back, left.
b. Dec. 1872, Dover Township, Ohio
d. 1954
Elvie was the third child of Perry and Sarah Powell. She married twice, first to Chauncey Stevens and then to Wirt W. Dodd. Wirt’s parents, Charles and Anna Dodd, immigrated from the Isle of Man to Dover and started a fruit farm. Wirt took over his father’s farm for a time where he and Elvie would have two children together. By 1930 the couple took on other jobs, Wirt as a house builder, and Elvie as a dressmaker. Sometime in the late 1930s, Elvie went to live with her widowed daughter, Sarah Wymer, in Cleveland. She passed away at the age of 82.


Isaac Clinton “Clint” Powell
Back, middle.
b. Oct. 1870, Ohio
d. 25 Jan. 1926, Village of Bay, Ohio
Clint was the first child of Perry and Sarah Powell. He married Amanda Wuebker on March 2, 1905. Amanda’s parents were Friedrich and Ernestine Wuebker who immigrated from Buscherheide, Hanover, Prussia. Friedrich passed away when Amanda was young, so she and her family went to live with her uncle in Dover. Her brother, Ernie, was the mailman on the first rural mail route out of West Dover.
Clint and Amanda had four children together who they raised on their fruit farm on Bradley Road. He passed away at the age of 56, leaving the farm to his wife. She ran the farm until her death twenty years later.


Mary Katherine Powell
Back, right.
b. 10 Jun. 1878, Ohio
d. 20 Oct. 1924, Santa Barbara, California
Mary was the third child of Perry and Sarah Powell. She worked as a teacher before marrying William H. Greene on June 16, 1902. William Greene was the son of William B. and Caroline Greene, and worked as a farmer before working as an electrical engineer. The couple lived with William’s parents at least until 1910, before moving to California, where William bought a farm. Mary passed away at the age of 46 and is buried in Santa Barbara Cemetery in California.

Frame #24: Notable Bay Village Residents

William Sadler
b. 23 Sept. 1791, Laurel Hill, Pennsylvania
d. 23 Mar. 1875, Dover Township, Ohio
William Sadler was the son of Christopher Saddler and Sophia Oritz. In the War of 1812 he was a corporal under Captain Harris and participated in the Battle of Lake Erie as a sharpshooter. During the war he traveled through Dover Township and decided to settle there, purchasing Lots #92 and #98 along the Lake Erie shoreline. He arrived in Dover with his father in 1814 where the two prepared a home for William’s family by clearing the land and building a log cabin. In 1815, he traveled back to New York to bring his wife, Elizabeth Tryon and their daughter Sophia to Dover.
William and Elizabeth founded the Dover Lake Shore Methodist Episcopal Church in North Dover Township (today, Bay Village) in June 1827. The church met in their log cabin until William and Elizabeth deeded part of their land to the building of a frame church, providing materials and raising funds as well. William passed away at 84 years old and is buried in Lakeside Cemetery.


Henry Foote
Frame #24, far right
b. 21 Apr. 1844, Dover Township, Ohio
d. 12 Mar. 1919, Village of Bay, Ohio
Henry Foote was the son of Ransom Foote (son of David Foote) and Catharine Porter Foote (daughter of Asahel Porter). David Foote was an early settler of Bay Village. Around 1815, he bought Lot #97 in Dover Township where he built a log cabin and raised his family.  Asahel Porter, Catharine’s father, arrived in Dover the same afternoon as the Cahoons.
Henry Foote, along with his siblings, helped farm the original Foote homestead. Eventually, Henry took over the remaining portion of the farm after part of it was sold. He raised mainly fruits and berries on his farm and also worked as a land agent for the Lake Shore Electric Interurban. He never married, living with his sister at the old family homestead. He passed away at the age of 75 and is buried in Lakeside Cemetery.


Reuben Osborn
Frame #24, middle left
b. 4 Nov. 1778, New Haven, Connecticut
d. 24 Mar. 1860, Dover Township, Ohio
Reuben Osborn and his brother-in-law Asahel Porter arrived in Dover Township on the same day as Joseph Cahoon on October 10, 1810. He permanently settled in Dover a year later with his wife, Sarah Johnson Osborn. He built the oldest frame house between Cleveland and Lorain in 1815. Reuben donated land for the first schoolhouse in Dover as well as the first cemetery. He passed away at the age of 81 and is buried in the cemetery he helped create: Lakeside Cemetery, Bay Village, Ohio.
This portrait, as well as Sarah Osborn’s, are carte de visite portraits. True to the carte de visite form, they were mailed to a member of the Foote family where they were placed in a photo album. Both have a green 3 cent telegraph stamp on the back, dated 10/22/1864.


Sarah Johnson Osborn
Frame #24, middle right
b. 8 Aug. 1779, Woodbridge, Connecticut
d. 6 Sept. 1858, Dover Township, Ohio
Sarah Johnson was the daughter of Eliphalet and Mary Johnson. She married Reuben Osborn in Bristol, Connecticut. Her sister married Asahel Porter. Asahel’s family along with Sarah’s husband and her brother Leverett Johnson, arrived in Dover Township in 1810. Reuben returned for her and waited for spring to settle in Dover permanently as a family in 1811. Her brother, Leverett, married Abigail Cahoon in the Cahoon log house in 1814. He later became the Justice of the Peace and served in the State Legislature.
Sarah and Reuben had three children together, but their only son, Selden, was the only child to survive to adulthood. He had a son named Reuben who would become the first mayor of Bay Village after it seceded from Dover. Sarah passed away at the age of 79 and is buried in Lakeside Cemetery, Bay Village, Ohio.

Frame #25: Joel and Margaret Cahoon’s Sons

Joel and Margaret had six sons, five of which survived to adulthood. Of the five, only Thomas married. Thomas and John Marshall were the only two brothers to outlive their mother.


Thomas Havenner Cahoon
Frames #8, #15, #25
b. 7 July 1832, Fredericktown, Maryland
d. 16 Apr. 1907, Cleveland, Ohio
Thomas Havenner Cahoon was the eldest child of Joel and Margaret Cahoon. He was the only child to ever marry, marrying Elizabeth Hughes on March 27th, 1860. He was a member of the Cleveland City Council, a partner in the lumber firm Cahoon & Hutchinson as well as in the manufacturing firm Moore, Cahoon, & Co. He passed away at the age of 75 and was buried in Lakeside Cemetery.


John Joseph Cahoon
b. 9 Jan. 1834, Fredericktown, Maryland
d. 4 Mar. 1894, Dover, Ohio
John Joseph Cahoon was the second child of Joel and Margaret Cahoon. He grew up at Rose Hill but later moved to Memphis, Tennessee where he worked as a mechanical engineer. He returned to Rose Hill when he contracted tuberculosis. He passed away at the age of 60 and is buried in Lakeside Cemetery.


Daniel Kenyon Cahoon
Frames #25, #30
b. 25 Jan. 1838, Clear Spring, Maryland
d. 15 Feb. 1890, Cleveland, Ohio
Daniel Kenyon Cahoon was the fourth child of Joel and Margaret Cahoon. Little is known about his life including what he did for a living. However, in the 1880 census he was listed as a ticket agent. He never married. Daniel passed away at 52 and is buried in Lakeside Cemetery.


Leverett Judson Cahoon
Frames #11, #25
b. 14 Nov. 1845, Dover Township, Ohio
d. 16 Aug. 1886, Dover Township, Ohio
Leverett Cahoon was the eighth child of Joel and Margaret Cahoon. He took over the farm after Joel became too ill. In addition, he and his younger brother, John Marshall Cahoon, became proprietors of the Cahoon Store around 1860. The brothers also started a fishery, as well as shipped fruit on the Nickel Plate Railroad, which had built a train station adjacent to their store. He lived to be 41, when he passed away of typhoid fever. Leverett is buried in the family lot in Lakeside Cemetery.


John Marshall Cahoon
Frames #15, #25, #27
b. 29 July 1847, Dover Township, Ohio
d. 8 Aug. 1899, Dover Township, Ohio
John Marshall Cahoon was the ninth child of Joel and Margaret Cahoon. He often went by “Pat” or “Patrick.” He was appointed the postmaster of North Dover in 1892. He passed away at the age of 52 when his carriage overturned on his way home from the Cahoon Store. John Marshall is buried in the family lot in Lakeside Cemetery.

Frame #26: Joel Butler Cahoon

A series of crayon enlargements of family photographs continue to be displayed on the walls of Rose Hill. This photograph of Joel Cahoon was enlarged by John Kavanagh of Cleveland in 1881. He studied at the National Academy of Design in New York, studied genre painting in Munich, and studied at the Académie Julian in Paris. In Cleveland he became well known for his portraiture, specifically in crayon as seen here. Kavanagh also painted landscapes, including one of Rose Hill which hangs in the 1818 parlor. In 1889, he became the director of the Art Club in Cleveland, teaching portraiture and figure painting. He passed away in 1898.
To read more about Joel Cahoon, visit frame #5.

Frame #27: John Marshall Cahoon

This photograph of John Marshall Cahoon served as the reference for a crayon enlargement by an unknown artist. The enlargement process began with the sun. A camera with an angled mirror captured the sunlight and directed it through the photo negative and an enlarging lens onto a piece of treated paper. This took several hours, and the mirror had to constantly be adjusted to account for the sun’s movement. Between this and any inherent flaws in the image now seen at a much larger scale, they almost always had to be retouched and enhanced using crayons and paint. A skilled artist could maintain the original photograph’s realism, providing a portrait that was worthy of framing and hanging on the wall.
To learn more about John Marshall Cahoon go to frame #25.

Frame #28: Martha Washington Cahoon

This portrait of Martha Washington Cahoon was done by an unknown artist. It may be a crayon enlargement, although the effect is more painterly than Joel’s or John Marshall’s. To learn more about Martha, visit frame #17.

Frame #29: Lydia Elizabeth Cahoon

This crayon portrait of Lydia Elizabeth Cahoon is signed “Tanquerey, Brooklyn, N.Y.C.” A positive identification of the artist is difficult, although an ‘A. Tanquerey’ won a Medal of Merit in photographs and crayon portraits in 1890. However, Tanquerey is also associated with a crayon portrait scam. In a 1891 circular for the Tanquerey Portrait Society, signed by an ‘A. Tanquerey,’ a free crayon portrait is advertised. An interested party would send a photograph to be turned into a larger portrait free of charge.
The deal was too good to be true. After the photograph was sent, the customer would be sent a pamphlet advertising extravagant frames they would have to buy before receiving their original photograph and portrait. If the customer refused, they would receive neither. In 1893, the Tanquerey Portrait Society was banned from using the U.S. mail. A few years afterwards the scam was running in France and Australia, with warnings of the ‘swindle’ being printed in the newspaper.
It appears that Lydia was able to secure a quality portrait from Tanquerey. Maybe she decided the frame was worth the trouble, or Tanquerey had yet to turn his crayon portrait business into an international scam.
To learn more about Lydia, go to frame #17.

Frame #30: Daniel Kenyon Cahoon

This photograph of Daniel Kenyon Cahoon was used to make a crayon enlargement similar in style to Martha’s portrait. To learn more about Daniel, visit frame #25.

Frame #31: Victoria Eliza Clague Tuttle

b. 10 Mar. 1839, Dover Township, Ohio
d. 10 Jan. 1930, Village of Bay, Ohio
Victoria Clague was the daughter of Robert Clague and Margaret Cowle. Her parents were from the Isle of Man, marrying in Lonan in 1837 before immigrating to Dover before Victoria’s birth in 1839. Victoria married Ezra W. Tuttle on May 31, 1873. She passed away at the age of 91 and is buried in Evergreen Cemetery, Westlake, Ohio.

Frame #32: Ezra Tuttle

b. 12 Feb. 1837, Dover Township, Ohio
d. 23 July 1921, Village of Bay, Ohio
Ezra W. Tuttle was the second child of Dexter Tuttle and Amelia Weidner Tuttle. Dexter was an early settler of Dover, arriving in 1823 at age 16. Ezra helped his father build a frame house for the family in 1845. The family’s land along Lake Road was split amongst the children, with Ezra farming a portion by Columbia road. He passed away at the age of 84 and is buried in Evergreen Cemetery, Westlake, Ohio.

Frame #33: Jeanette Bates Aldrich

b. 6 Feb. 1841, Avon, Ohio
d. 27 May 1931, Village of Bay, Ohio
Laura Jeanette Bates was the sixth child of Daniel and Rachel Bates. She married William Waterman and Martha Aldrich’s first son, William Waterman Aldrich II. They lived in a house William II built on land he had bought from Christian Saddler. Many additions were added and Jeanette cared for a large flower garden on the grounds. Jeanette passed away at the age of 90 and is buried in Evergreen Cemetery in Westlake, Ohio.

Frame #34: William Waterman Aldrich

b. 17 Oct. 1817, Dover Township, Ohio
d. 19 Nov. 1903, Lorain, Ohio
William Waterman Aldrich was the son of Aaron Aldrich III and Elizabeth Winsor. He was born in Dover before the family left for New York. They returned when William was twelve. He was a successful farmer and rancher, eventually becoming a breeder of Hereford cattle in Elyria. He passed away at the age of 86 and is buried in Lakeside Cemetery.

Frame #35: Martha Bassett Aldrich

b. 7 Oct. 1818, Dover Township, Ohio
d. 29 Nov. 1875, Dover Township, Ohio
Martha Bassett was the daughter of Nathan Bassett and Martha Hall. Her father was an early settler of Dover, arriving in 1811 and serving as a town trustee from 1813 to 1839. Martha married William Waterman Aldrich on July 4, 1840 and they had eight children together. She passed away at the age of 57 from tuberculosis and is buried in Lakeside Cemetery.

Frame #36: Miss Prince

b. Unknown
d. Unknown
Miss Prince was a fellow school teacher and friend of the Cahoon sisters. Her first name is unknown.

Frame #37: Thomas Cahoon

This is likely a photograph of a young Thomas Cahoon. To learn more about Thomas, go to frame #25.

Frame #38: Elizabeth Cahoon

b. 19 Nov. 1830, Ohio
d. 4 Oct. 1914, Cleveland, Ohio
Elizabeth Hughes was the first child of Richard Hughes and Elizabeth Elder. She married Thomas Havenner Cahoon in Cincinnati, Ohio on March 27, 1860.
They settled in Cleveland and had one daughter together, Effie, and adopted another daughter, Anna. Elizabeth passed away at the age of 84, outliving both her husband and Effie. She is buried in Lakeside Cemetery.

General References

Photography
A Brief History of the Carte de Visite.” American Museum of Photography, 2004.
Cabinet Card.” City Gallery, 2005.
National Museum of Scotland. Victorian photographic techniques.
“Transformations in Cleveland Art.” (CMA, 1996), p. 232.

Crayon Enlargement
Gary E. Albright and Michael K. Lee. “A Short Review of Crayon Enlargements: History, Technique, and Treatment.” Topics in Photographic Preservation, vol. 3, Photographic Materials Group of the American Institute for Conservation of Historic & Artistic Works, 1989, pp. 28-36.

Tanquerey Portrait Society
Proper, Forrest. “1891 Circular Letter from the Tanqueray Portrait Society.” Bookin‘!, Joslin Hall Rare Books catalog, no. 10, May 2014, pp. 8-9.
R. “Dear Bulletin.” The Bulletin, 30 Mar. 1901, p. 31. Trove.
Illustrated Catalogue and Price List. Tanquerey Portrait Society (Brooklyn N.Y.), 1891. Winterthur Museum Library, Archive.org.

Genealogy
Bay Village: Way of Life. Bay Village Historical Society, 1974.
Sheldon, Keith M. Descendants of Early Bay Village Families. 5 Aug 1999.
Flament, Catherine Burke. Retracing Footsteps: Lakeside Cemetery, Bay Village, Cuyahoga County, Ohio. Bay Village Historical Society, 2006.

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