Sherman Osborn House

29560 Lake Road – 1853. Reuben Osborn bought his land from the Connecticut Land Company for one dollar an acre. Reuben gave his grandchildren Sherman, Reuben, Samuel, David and Betsey each a parcel of this property for a farm.

The grandchildren raised berries, fruits and grapes and, on a smaller scale, raised oats, corn and wheat to supply their own needs. They also fished. Life was difficult, requiring many hours preparing the fruit for market, which was sold, for the most part, in stalls on Broadway Road in Cleveland.

The person selling the fruit had to rise at 1 a.m. and drive some 14 miles to market, as most of the business was in full swing by 5 a.m. Then, too, they had to get the pickers and take them back as far as Rocky River during the time when the harvest was at its best.

Sherman Osborn farmed at 29560 Lake Road and married Nettie Phinney. His children were Calvin, Albert and Emily. His second wife was Myra Yoder.

Selden Osborn House

29059 Lake Road – 1832. This is the second-oldest inhabited home in the city. The Osborn home was the birthplace of three generations. Nancy and Selden lived here all their lives. The house had a gas well and a water tank, and it is said that this was the first house in the village with a bathroom. Many of the near greats of Cleveland came to the home for their summer vacations as paying guests. Selden was an herb doctor, receiving his training in a doctor’s office. He grew his own herbs. Nancy brewed them for him. He traveled by horseback with his two saddle bags – one for his own use, the other for his medicine.

Reuben Osborn house

Cahoon Memorial Park – 1815. The Osborns came from England in 1641 and are one of the oldest families in the United States. Reuben Osborn was born in Connecticut and lived in New York with his wife Sarah and their children Polly and Selden. Reuben Osborn brought his family to Dover Township in 1811. They came in a large canoe from Cleveland and landed on the Lake Erie beach near the Porter cabin. Mrs. Osborn and Mrs. Porter were sisters. Three years later, when Mrs. Porter and her infant son were drowned and buried in Lakeside Cemetery, Sarah Osborn raised her three other children as her own.

Osborn, a farmer and fruit grower, built a log cabin, but, in 1815, he constructed the first “modern” house in Bay Village, meaning that it was of frame construction and not made of logs. Several years ago, the land that the Reuben Osborn house sat upon was sold to a developer and the house was donated to the City of Bay Village. The city moved the home a mile east along Lake Road to where it sits today, next to Rose Hill Museum in Cahoon Memorial Park.